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Lewis Nixon - Vat 69


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#1 dave-o

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Posted 30 December 2003 - 08:03 AM

Hi All!


Does anyone know why Lewis Nixon only seems to drink VAT 69 whisky in the Band of Brothers series? Is this some kind of advertising deal or did it actually happen?

#2 homefront41

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Posted 30 December 2003 - 10:36 AM

It happened. VAT 69 was a popular Scotch whisky at that time.

#3 hooper117

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Posted 30 December 2003 - 05:00 PM

Didn't I read somewhere that Nixon's family actually had something to do with making Vat69? Or perhaps just owned stock in the company? Or did I dream that?
I've read so much about the men from Easy over the last 2+ years ( can it really be over 2 years ago BoB first aired?? ) that I may be starting to make things up in my head. :D

Sue

#4 TomC

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Posted 30 December 2003 - 05:08 PM

Amazing...Vat69 is not all that smooth. I stumbled across it in a local package store and had to try it out. With water it's not bad but straight up? Woof! :D

#5 seanx

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 03:53 PM

TomC,
It strikes me funny you mentioned trying Vat69, as I have wondered time and again whether it was still being made. I'll have to look for it next time I can. I'll give my review then.

Cheers!

#6 TomC

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 05:43 PM

seanx:

Compared to the typical stores of scotch (in the U.S.), it is very cheap -- $16 for a half gallon!

#7 appell8

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 06:16 PM

Back before our friend Tim became a clean living Airman and family man, back in the days when he was a dissolute college student, he undertook a picaresque adventure through the environs of Detroit in search of an elusive bottle of Vat 69. If his post survived the Cyberstorm, it is worth doing a search for it.

Vat 69 was sufficiently fashionable that the Princeton Class of '39 adopted a "Vat '39" logo as their permanent class symbol. They display it to this day.

But I would agree with Tim, Mark, and Tom that, for whatever reason, the Scotch that makes its way to these shores these days is much, much superior to Vat 69.

Edited by appell8, 03 January 2004 - 06:17 PM.


#8 homefront41

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 08:34 PM

For some reason I never fathomed, VAT 69 graphics and memorabilia had some value. When the subject of the brand first came up after Band of Brothers aired, I tossed VAT 69 into a few search engines and found a number of sites offering pre-war posters and other branded materials. Today, all that came up was this from the Scotch Whisky site and a few others:

http://www.scotchwhi...nded/vat_69.htm

#9 Jimmydoorknobs

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Posted 03 January 2004 - 09:09 PM

I did find in my rumaging a Vat69 bottle opener....... Perhaps at the coming gathering everyone could bring some Vat and there could be a Nixon party. Lewis, that is ,not Richard. Wouldn't want anyone's hotel room broken into.

#10 Etienne

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 03:13 PM

The liquors of today are far superior compared to the liquors of yesteryear. During the late 1930s,' 40s and into the ' 50s, scotch whisky was rationed and the single malts were simply too expensive and too hard to get. Here enters the blended scotch whisky for which the Vat 69 was a premium blend. Johnny Walker came into the picture at the turn of the century and was the scotch that came into everyone's mind because is was affordable and a product for the bootleggers of the prohibition times. "Hand-Brand" grain alcohol from Canada would be used for the "bathtub" varieties of booze and sugar (liquor) alcohol had also come into the picture as a cheap substitute.

Vat 69 today is just another one of the blended scotch whiskies and not the big deal that it once was. The single malts, single grains and vatted pure malts have taken over from the blended varieties.

#11 Jimmydoorknobs

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 07:03 PM

Steve, Most excellant rendition of historical sipping.

#12 appell8

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 08:20 PM

Steve, I concur with my esteemed colleague JDK. Everything in that post is new to me. Thanks, Doug

#13 Highlandpiper

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Posted 04 January 2004 - 08:50 PM

What's interesting to me is how much the noted "singles" distilleries of today go into the blends. In my cabinet stand several singles - Oban, Balvenie, Cragganmore, Balmore, Macallan, and Dalwhinnie (no snobbery or bragging rights here - collected over several months and by the kindness of my wife and in-laws. Bless them all!). I did not know until a while ago how much many of the finer distilleries are used in the blends of today. I am curious what some of you think - is there a niche out there for premium blends, and the blender's art, much as with sherry?

Paul

#14 seanx

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Posted 11 January 2004 - 04:04 PM

I had some time to kill before the public library opened this morning and I went to a local "antiques" mall/store. Not a few minutes in, and I discovered a ceramic jug, about 4 and a half inches tall, black outside, white inside, with "Vat 69 - the leader of all Scotch" (something to that effect) on the outside. I chuckled and wondered about it's age. It was only a few dollars, so I may go back and get it...anybody into these things enough to tell me more about it? I thought it'd be fun to have around.

#15 Etienne

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Posted 11 January 2004 - 07:07 PM

Seanx, all the major distilleries have promotions, vis-a vis public relations, and put out different collectors bottles. Some for special occasions like bicentennials & anniversaries and for special holidays,etc. Jim Beam is famous for their porcelain / ceramic jugs that come out annually. Another example is whenever Jack Daniels puts out a new product, they usually use a decanter of some sort like they did when JD introduced the "Gentleman Jack" concoction. Collectors will never break the seals and naturally these "jugs" establish some degree of value over time.

Paul (Highlandpiper), the most popular ones would be: Dalwhinnie, Macallan 18, Glenmorangie, Macallan 25 and probably Highland Park for the single malt lovers. When it comes to blending, the bottlers purchase the overruns from these distillers and formulate their own recipes to incorporate into their own distilled spirits and sell at a lessor price, usually. There certainly is a niche for these spirits just like the finer tobaccos.

Hope this answers your questions...




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