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Stalin Dies 1953


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#1 markone

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 04:11 AM

Joseph Stalin Dies 1953

The death of Joseph Stalin was officially announced at just after 0100 GMT on 6 March.
The statement said he had died at 2150 local time on 5 March.
Hundreds of thousands of people queued to see Joseph Stalin's body lying-in-state.
He was embalmed and put on display alongside the first Soviet leader, Vladimir Illyich Lenin, in his mausoleum in Red Square in Moscow.
But Nikita Khrushchev, who became Soviet leader after a power struggle, led a move to denounce Stalin as a tyrant who caused millions of deaths.
In 1961 Stalin's body was removed from its place in the honoured Lenin's Tomb.
It was reburied near the Kremlin wall along with other minor figures from the Bolshevik Revolution.


Strange how history can change once a hero and champion of the nation in Leninís tomb next minute buried with nobodies.


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#2 Bart

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 04:15 AM

Did you know that he died in the presence of Beria (head of the KGB) and others.

When Stalin closed his eyes, Beria started to cheer! A bit too early though, because Stalin opened his eyes again. When Beria saw that Stalin wasn't dead yet, he turned pale and lost his breath in great fear (so the story goes).

It was the dictators last "joke"... a few seconds later he closed his eyes perminently.

Edited by Bart, 05 March 2004 - 04:16 AM.


#3 markone

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 04:19 AM

Now that is something I didn't know.
Poor bloke he must have had kittens when his eyes opened.

Mk1 :D

#4 BenAlmighty

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:16 AM

Ah thats classic. It's wonder why he didn't have him killed with his dying breath.

#5 BobFish

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 08:10 AM

Beria didn't live much longer afterwards did he? Old Khruschev had him executed I think.

#6 LongJohn

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 05:19 PM

Joseph Stalin Dies 1953

The death of Joseph Stalin was officially announced at just after 0100 GMT on 6 March.
The statement said he had died at 2150 local time on 5 March.
Hundreds of thousands of people queued to see Joseph Stalin's body lying-in-state.
He was embalmed and put on display alongside the first Soviet leader, Vladimir Illyich Lenin, in his mausoleum in Red Square in Moscow.
But Nikita Khrushchev, who became Soviet leader after a power struggle, led a move to denounce Stalin as a tyrant who caused millions of deaths.
In 1961 Stalin's body was removed from its place in the honoured Lenin's Tomb.
It was reburied near the Kremlin wall along with other minor figures from the Bolshevik Revolution.


Strange how history can change once a hero and champion of the nation in Leninís tomb next minute buried with nobodies.


Mk1

markone,

On the day of Stalin's death, I was attending the Russian Language Course at the Army School Of Languages, European Division, Oberammergau, Germany. All of our Language teachers - and most of the faculty - were Russian defectors, many members of the regional Komiktee Zentralnie Abez Bolshevism. They were perhaps 100 in number, but the cheering, jubilation, joy, and glee they expressed were almost deafening, and tantamount to VE and VJ Days combined.

Cheeriest, of course, were the Ukranians; my language teacher, Nadyezhda (Hope) Papluiko the most elated and joyous of all. She and Sasha (Alexander), her husband, had WALKED from Lvov,Russia to Vienna, Austria through the Pripet marshes and the forests of Hartzebovinia (where she had a child in the wilderness) to reach the Allied forces and freedom.

It is such events that make me - us - realize just how precious is our freedom, just how different we are from most of the rest of the world, and that we Americans take entirely too much for granted.

"Shirika strana maya radnaya,"

Y.o.s.,

LongJohn

#7 LFOD

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Posted 11 March 2004 - 02:11 PM

The Onion - Sunday March 8, 1953

Soviets Mourn Loss of Stalin
"Who will crush our spirits and destroy our will to live now?" Ask
distraught citizens

MOSCOW - Josef Stalin has been dead for 3 days, yet many Russians
remain as distraught as when the news first broke. This nation has
lost its figurehead, its overlord, its despot - the man whose
insatiable lust for power was strong enough to drive him to enslave,
cripple, and slaughter the people of the U.S.S.R.

"It seems like only yesterday that Stalin's thugs were battering me
in the Alley," Said former university professor Grigori
Vassely, "and then arresting me on ficticious charges because my
lectures mentione Thomas Jefferson once or twice. Who can replace
such a ruthless tyrant? I doubt Malenkov can summon such hard, pure
hatred. As far as I know, he has no paranoid vendetta against
academia whatsoever. Stalin was simply one of a kind."

Homeless alcoholic Fyodor Alexeyev likewise feels nostalgia for a
bygone era. "I had my farm siezed in 1939 under collectivization and
was forced into the Army with minimal training and equipment," he
said. "After two hellish years in a German POW camp, I finally
returned to beautiful Leningrad, only to be interned in a Russian
concentration camp. Now, the great man who put me there has been
taken from us. I don't know if I have the strength to go on."

Former Central Committee member Igor Missirovsky remembers being
indicted for the assasination of Leningrad moderate Sergei Kirov.
Missirovsky was eventually cleared, only to be tried by Stalin on
baseless charges of infant cannibalism in the Moscow show trials of
the late '30's.

"All I had was taken from me, despite my fanatical loyalty to the
charismatic icon that was Josef Stalin," Missirovsky said. He fears
that now, such gloriously horrible days are long gone: "I don't
think the new guard leadership of Russia even has a brutal secret
police, much less plans to unleash them in a senseless reign of
terror on innocent citizens."

Perhaps most shocked by the sudden loss are the Kremlin's doctors,
who at the time of Stalin's death were bracing for a hideous blood
purge in the wake of his accusations of a seditious conspiracy
within their ranks. "We were all set for another trumped-up witch
hunt we we had recieved word that he passed away," Kremlin Chief
Physician Anatoly Ryebgenev said. "If there were only another insane
tryant to succeed him, we could be accused of complicity in Stalin's
death and return to purposeless slavery under the crushing yoke of
oppression. Regrettably however, Malenkov has shown himself to be
reasonable and in full contact with reality. It all seems like a bad
dream, a surreal nightmare in which a benevolent leader treats his
people with fairness and dignity."

Malenkov addressed the people of Russia via radio Saturday, assuring
them that he would strive to carry on Stalin's great legacy of
brutality and oppression.



Reminder: Strip defeatists of weapons and gear before sending to clear minefields......

#8 BobFish

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Posted 11 March 2004 - 04:53 PM

:D The Onion is great - I remember reading that one.

#9 markone

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Posted 12 March 2004 - 04:29 AM

It is such events that make me - us - realize just how precious is our freedom, just how different we are from most of the rest of the world, and that we Americans take entirely too much for granted.

"Shirika strana maya radnaya,"

Y.o.s.,

LongJohn

How right you are Colonel.
There are so many in the UK and the rest of Europe who also take those same liberties.

Did your language teacher's child survive? I do hope so. That is an outstanding story to tell their children.

Mk1 :D




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